Oregon Zoo's Renovated Red Ape Reserve Opens

Red Ape Reserve gives clients the unprecedented opportunity to observe the two species indoors and out
Oregon Zoo's renovated Red Ape Reserve // (c) 2010, Oregon Zoo/Carli Davidson
Oregon Zoo's renovated Red Ape Reserve // (c) 2010, Oregon Zoo/Carli Davidson

The Details

Now that the Oregon Zoo has completed renovations of its Red Ape Reserve, visitors can see its resident orangutans -- 50-year-old Inji and her grandson Katai -- as they explore their new home.

The orangutans and their white-cheeked gibbon roommates are, for the first time, experiencing a natural habitat complete with foliage and weather evocative of their native Southeast Asia.

Red Ape Reserve gives clients the unprecedented opportunity to observe the two species indoors and out as they literally climb and swing over visitors' heads. Zoo guests can safely watch the animals through porthole windows in a massive log tunnel that cuts through the outdoor area.

A 5,400-square-foot mesh-enclosed outdoor space increases the size of the orangutans' home by more than three-and-one-half times. The animals get mental stimulation from the signature "enrichment tree," where keepers place treats and toys for the primates to discover as they would food in the wild.

Constructed in 1959, the primate building has undergone significant renovations over the past five years, transforming it into a state-of-the-art, naturalistic experience for animals and visitors alike. As the cornerstone exhibit for the Asian wing of the building, Red Ape Reserve transports visitors to the orangutans' and white-cheeked gibbons' fragile Southeast Asian habitats.

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