Houston Introduces CityPass

What do Houston’s top attractions have in common with the Statue of Liberty, the Sears Tower, the Georgia Aquarium and Disneyland? All are CityPass attractions, offered via a discounted ticket booklet with the CityPass seal of approval.


What do Houston’s top attractions have in common with the Statue of Liberty, the Sears Tower, the Georgia Aquarium and Disneyland? All are CityPass attractions, offered via a discounted ticket booklet with the CityPass seal of approval.

Houston CityPass debuted on May 13, offering visitors a concentrated, vacation-size entree to the city — at big savings. Tickets to the top eight attractions in Houston are offered in each CityPass, which helps answer the frequently-asked question: “What is there to do in Houston?” CityPass executives have studied the Houston market and its appeal as a tourist destination and feel it is an ideal market for the program.

“Houston is a wonderful surprise for anyone who hasn’t been in awhile,” said Mike Gallagher, co-founder of CityPass. “We’re delighted we were encouraged to take a look. What we found was the perfect CityPass city — a big city with small town friendliness and sights you can see nowhere else, like Space Center Houston on the grounds of NASA or the four-generation cattle-to-oil baron spread of the George Ranch. Every museum and attraction is unique and worth seeing, which is why they are part of CityPass.”

Houston is the first city in Texas and the Southwest to offer CityPass.

The Houston CityPass will cost $34 for adults (a $63.40 value) and $24 for children ages 4-11 (a $44.70 value). In addition to offering the least expensive CityPass in the program, Houston is also an economical city to visit. The average hotel rate is around $99 per night, and the average price of a meal is $5 less than the national average.

Greater Houston Convention and Visitors Bureau
www.visithoustontexas.com

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