On the Lares Trail With Mountain Lodges of Peru

On the Lares Trail With Mountain Lodges of Peru

Mountain Lodges of Peru takes travelers off the Inca Trail to deliver a tailor-made adventure By: Valerie Chen
<p>Resting at the top of Cruzccasa Pass in Peru with a new hiking companion. // © 2015 Valerie Chen</p><p>Feature image (above): Outside of Pisac...

Resting at the top of Cruzccasa Pass in Peru with a new hiking companion. // © 2015 Valerie Chen

Feature image (above): Outside of Pisac Market // © 2015 Valerie Chen


Related Content

Before you go, brush up on these Machu Picchu facts and tips for the best possible experience.

Instagram

To see photos from the author's Lares Adventure to Machu Picchu experience, search the hashtag #TAWgoestoperu.

The Details

Mountain Lodges of Peru
www.mountainlodgesofperu.com

PromPeru
www.peru.travel

Sacred Wheels
www.sacredwheels.com

Alarm clock be damned: It was just shy of 6 a.m. on the second day of my Lares Adventure to Machu Picchu, and I had already flung myself out of bed and laced up my hiking shoes. The opportunity to mingle with Lamay Lodge’s good-natured resident llamas before departing for Ancasmarca, a nearby archaeological site, had quickened my normally sluggish morning pace.

Unexpected, delightful details — including several run-ins with mama llama Angelica and her two kids, Cupid and Chimuela — dotted my five-day tour with Mountain Lodges of Peru (MLP). Starting in Cusco, the local operator skirts the traditional Inca Trail and takes guests on the less crowded but just as rewarding Lares Trail. This road less traveled twists and turns through the Sacred Valley, lending itself to one far-flung Andean village after another.

“The trip would appeal to someone who wants to have the experience of going to Machu Picchu, but with a little more depth,” said Nadia Le Bon, sales and marketing manager for North America for MLP. “This person likes the outdoors and maybe isn’t a committed hiker, but still wants to dabble in adventure.”

This isn’t MLP’s first rodeo, however. In 2007, the operator introduced its Salkantay program, another alternative route to the ruins. More physically demanding than the Lares option — which launched in October 2014 — it was met with acclaim from travelers intrepid enough to hike for six to eight hours up to Salkantay Pass (and at 15,213 feet elevation, no less).

But I shouldn’t give the Salkantay Trail trekkers — or anyone doing the Lares Trail, including myself — much credit, because seeing Peru with MLP hardly qualifies as “roughing it.” Rather than retire to a tent or hostel each night, I checked into a four- or five-star property, such as Lamay Lodge in Lamay and Huacahuasi Lodge in Huacahuasi (both owned and operated by MLP). Other accommodation highlights included Tambo del Inka, a Luxury Collection Resort & Spa in Urubamba and Inkaterra Machu Picchu Pueblo Hotel in Aguas Calientes.

When I wasn’t winding down in comfort, though, MLP kept me plenty busy. After a multicourse dinner each night — often prepared by a private chef — the affable guides would present the next day’s activities, ranging from soft adventure to culturally immersive experiences.

“The trend in travel is more customized with more options,” Le Bon said. “Having choices is very important for people. This is the perfect solution, and travelers know they’re in good hands.”

Photos & Videos
Local operator Mountain Lodges of Peru (MLP) helps travelers experience culture and soft adventure on the Lares Trail. // © 2015 Valerie Chen

Local operator Mountain Lodges of Peru (MLP) helps travelers experience culture and soft adventure on the Lares Trail. // © 2015 Valerie Chen

A member of the Viacha community shares her farming practices. // © 2015 Valerie Chen

A member of the Viacha community shares her farming practices. // © 2015 Valerie Chen

Potatoes are an essential crop for the isolated Viacha community. // © 2015 Valerie Chen

Potatoes are an essential crop for the isolated Viacha community. // © 2015 Valerie Chen

Travelers can explore the archeological site of Ancasmarca. // © 2015 Valerie Chen

Travelers can explore the archeological site of Ancasmarca. // © 2015 Valerie Chen

One of the friendly llamas at the MLP-owned Lamay Lodge // © 2015 Valerie Chen

One of the friendly llamas at the MLP-owned Lamay Lodge // © 2015 Valerie Chen

Vibrantly-dressed local women in the town square of Lamay // © 2015 Valerie Chen

Vibrantly-dressed local women in the town square of Lamay // © 2015 Valerie Chen

While on the road, catch glimpses of small-town life. // © 2015 Valerie Chen

While on the road, catch glimpses of small-town life. // © 2015 Valerie Chen

Pack horses carry supplies on hikes. // © 2015 Valerie Chen

Pack horses carry supplies on hikes. // © 2015 Valerie Chen

A mother-and-daughter pair spotted while hiking over Cruzccasa Pass. // © 2015 Valerie Chen

A mother-and-daughter pair spotted while hiking over Cruzccasa Pass. // © 2015 Valerie Chen

Local operator Sacred Wheels takes travelers on a bike excursion through Urubamba. // © 2015 Valerie Chen

Local operator Sacred Wheels takes travelers on a bike excursion through Urubamba. // © 2015 Valerie Chen

Reward yourself with a post-ride feast. // © 2015 Valerie Chen

Reward yourself with a post-ride feast. // © 2015 Valerie Chen

The pool at Urubamba’s Tambo del Inka, a Luxury Collection Resort & Spa, which is one of the accommodations during the trek // © 2015 Valerie Chen

The pool at Urubamba’s Tambo del Inka, a Luxury Collection Resort & Spa, which is one of the accommodations during the trek // © 2015 Valerie Chen

Spend time in Aguas Calientes before heading to Machu Picchu in the morning. // © 2015 Valerie Chen

Spend time in Aguas Calientes before heading to Machu Picchu in the morning. // © 2015 Valerie Chen

Drinking coca tea can help alleviate altitude sickness. // © 2015 Valerie Chen

Drinking coca tea can help alleviate altitude sickness. // © 2015 Valerie Chen

The Andean cock-of-the-rock, Peru’s national bird // © 2015 Valerie Chen

The Andean cock-of-the-rock, Peru’s national bird // © 2015 Valerie Chen

The final day of the program takes travelers to Machu Picchu. // © 2015

The final day of the program takes travelers to Machu Picchu. // © 2015

Machu Picchu // © 2015 Valerie Chen

Machu Picchu // © 2015 Valerie Chen

Climb to the top of Huayna Picchu for a birds-eye view of the ruins. // © 2015 Valerie Chen

Climb to the top of Huayna Picchu for a birds-eye view of the ruins. // © 2015 Valerie Chen

I like a healthy mix. And so I ran my hands over vibrant textiles and attempted to haggle at the famous Pisac Market. I learned how essential potatoes — in all shapes, colors and sizes — are to the Viacha community and then feasted on a plate piled high with them, along with guinea pig and alpaca cooked pachamanca-style (smoked under hot stones for hours). I stepped gingerly around archaeological sites in Ollantaytambo and Pisac, marveling at the shrewdness and diligence of the ancient Inca people.

Other days I pushed myself physically. On a scenic four-hour trek over Cruzccasa Pass, my fellow hikers and I crossed paths with only two people: a mother-and-daughter pair from a local village. However, as we raced the sunset to the lodge, we also encountered a horde of alpacas, two wild horses and a mountain dog that decided to join our motley crew. In Urubamba, I learned that even the smallest hill can feel like Mount Everest when cycling at high elevation. Led by local operator Sacred Wheels, the 15-mile bike excursion is optional and has an additional cost, but is worth every extra nuevo sol.

Of course, there’s also the joy of reaching Machu Picchu on day five. This requires another early morning of sipping coca tea followed by lots of endurance, especially if you hike Huayna Picchu like I did. Perched on a stone ledge at the top, I gazed at a microscopic version of the ruins in the distance while butterflies danced around me — a sweet endnote to my whirlwind Peru experience.

Adventure Travel JDS Africa Middle East JDS Destinations
>