6 Filipino Foods Worth Traveling For

6 Filipino Foods Worth Traveling For

Whether it’s oxtail or duck embryo, Filipino dishes are sure to satisfy — or at least make for a great story By: Ashley Burnett
<p>Filipino cuisine is a delicious mix of Spanish, Chinese and indigenous influences.  // © 2015 Creative Commons User <a...

Filipino cuisine is a delicious mix of Spanish, Chinese and indigenous influences.  // © 2015 Creative Commons User nicoleabalde

Feature image (above): Pork shoulder adobo is a classic example of Filipino food.  // © 2015 Creative Commons User lumachrome


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The Philippines’ cuisine is an amalgamation of indigenous recipes and Spanish and Chinese influence. While some of these dishes may be found in other countries, the Philippines adds its own unique spin.

Below are five can’t-miss dishes that showcase all the best things about Filipino food: its intense flavor, creativity and resourcefulness. So, pass the pancit, and try not to look too long at the balut (duck embryo).

Adobo
No list about Filipino food is complete without mentioning adobo. While adobo is native to Spanish cuisine, the Filipino version of marinating meat and seafood in vinegar, soy sauce and garlic is indigenous to the Philippines. 

Chicken adobo is a popular variation, as well as pork adobo. Adobo exemplifies Filipino resourcefulness, as the marinade allows meat and seafood to take on a longer shelf life and maintain its flavor.

Balut
Balut is infamous not because of its taste, but because of how it looks. It is, after all, a half-boiled duck embryo tucked inside its own shell. Commonly sold as street food, balut can also be marinated in adobo or served salted. How old the embryo inside of the shell is entirely regional — some prefer their embryo with bones and others without. Those in the know will recommend that you slurp the warm soup inside before you eat the rest.

Champorado
Filipino champorado, a chocolate-flavored rice porridge, can be traced back to Mexico, where champurrado is a chocolate drink made with either corn flour or maize. The Filipino version, however, uses sticky rice and cocoa powder instead and can be served warm or cold. Champorado aficionados will tell you to always thin out the thick porridge by adding a little extra milk — and pour in some more sugar while you’re at it.

Photos & Videos
Travel to the Philippines for enjoyable local dishes, including meat and seafood cooked adobe-style (marinated in garlic, soy sauce and vinegar). // © 2015 Creative Commons user gezellig-girl

Travel to the Philippines for enjoyable local dishes, including meat and seafood cooked adobe-style (marinated in garlic, soy sauce and vinegar). // © 2015 Creative Commons user gezellig-girl

Made of sticky rice and cocoa powder, Filipino champorado is a chocolate rice porridge adapted from Mexican champurrado. // © 2015 Creative Commons user santos

Made of sticky rice and cocoa powder, Filipino champorado is a chocolate rice porridge adapted from Mexican champurrado. // © 2015 Creative Commons user santos

Kare-kare is a rich stew often reserved for special occasions. // © 2015 Creative Commons user symplex

Kare-kare is a rich stew often reserved for special occasions. // © 2015 Creative Commons user symplex

Pork sisig is considered by many Filipinos to be the perfect complement to beer.  // © 2015 Creative Commons user bigberto

Pork sisig is considered by many Filipinos to be the perfect complement to beer. // © 2015 Creative Commons user bigberto

Pancit palabok can be prepared multiple ways — and all of them are delicious. // © 2015 Creative Commons user lfl

Pancit palabok can be prepared multiple ways — and all of them are delicious. // © 2015 Creative Commons user lfl

Kare-kare
Kare-kare is a Filipino stew made of oxtail and various vegetables, such as eggplant or green beans, which is then thickened with peanut butter (a staple of Filipino dishes that can even be found in Filipino spaghetti). Kare-kare is a dish for special occasions, but its rich taste will make you want to eat it daily. 

Pancit Palabok
Pancit palabok is a shrimp-flavored noodle dish topped with pork cracklings, boiled shrimp and hard-boiled eggs. The dish is so ubiquitous that the Philippines’ famous chain of fast-food restaurants, Jollibee, offers its own version. Pancit palabok is just one way the Philippines prepares pancit (noodles), which is typically served at birthday parties to symbolize longevity for the birthday boy or girl — so don’t cut those long noodles!

Pork Sisig
Pork sisig is created by chopping up a pig’s ears, liver and face and then seasoning the mix with chili peppers and calamansi, a citrus fruit native to the Philippines. The dish was invented by Lucia Cunanan, which put her city, Angeles City, on the map as the “Sisig Capital of the Philippines.” Pork sisig is considered the perfect complement to beer and is usually served as an appetizer.

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