Meet Japan's First Glamping Resort, Hoshinoya Fuji

Meet Japan's First Glamping Resort, Hoshinoya Fuji

The new Hoshinoya Fuji, Japan’s first glamping resort, offers travelers a luxurious link to nature By: Shane Nelson
<p>Hoshinoya Fuji’s cabins are equipped with air-conditioning and bathrooms, but one-third of the floor plan is located outside. // © 2016 Hoshinoya...

Hoshinoya Fuji’s cabins are equipped with air-conditioning and bathrooms, but one-third of the floor plan is located outside. // © 2016 Hoshinoya Fuji

Feature image (above): Guests staying at the property will have unparalleled views of nearby Mount Fuji. // © 2016 Hoshinoya Fuji 

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The Details

Hoshino Resorts

Hoshinoya Fuji

Japan National Tourism Organization

Travelers headed to Japan can now take advantage of a new first for the destination’s accommodations scene: glamping.

Property officials are describing Hoshinoya Fuji, a new property surrounded by a red pine forest and overlooking Lake Kawaguchi near iconic Mount Fuji, as “the first glamping resort in Japan.” 

Fumi Miyauchi, director of global marketing for Hoshino Resorts, which operates Hoshinoya Fuji, says her company chose the new resort’s location “because this area is surrounded by beautiful Japanese nature, and it is the best place to enjoy Mount Fuji.”

According to Yoshiharu Hoshino, president of Hoshino Resorts, the property offers travelers the best of a luxury camping experience without any of the negatives. 

“We built cabins instead of a campground and equipped those cabins with air-conditioning and bathrooms to ensure absolute comfort,” he said. “We made sure a third of each cabin’s floor plan was located outdoors to allow guests the experience of sitting by a roaring fire.”  

Clients can also dine at outdoor communal tables and enjoy high-end, refined meals prepared by chefs who utilize as many local ingredients and produce as possible. Barbecues are another resort staple, but those deciding they’d prefer to dine in are also in luck, as the property offers both an indoor grill and in-room dining.

Meanwhile, Hoshinoya Fuji offers a range of activity options for travelers keen to explore the setting’s natural beauty, including canoeing on Lake Kawaguchi or hiking and even horseback riding through the Aokigahara forest — a national park often referred to as the “Sea of Trees.”  

“Every choice was made in an attempt to strike the perfect balance between luxury, comfort and ease and the special connection with nature experienced with traditional camping,” Hoshino said of the resort’s amenities and experiences.  

Room rates at Hoshinoya Fuji, which welcomed its first guests last October, start around $500 per night. According to Miyauchi, most guests stay at least two nights.