New Centrair Airport Covers the Bases

Devin Galaudet Starting as an idea nearly 30 years ago, newly named Centrair (the Central Japan International Airport) is scheduled to open Feb. 17 with plans to serve the 10 million people in the Nagoya area of Aichi Prefecture and transport millions of expected visitors to the upcoming locally hosted Wo

By: Devin Galaudet

Starting as an idea nearly 30 years ago, newly named Centrair (the Central Japan International Airport) is scheduled to open Feb. 17 with plans to serve the 10 million people in the Nagoya area of Aichi Prefecture and transport millions of expected visitors to the upcoming locally hosted World Exposition in Aichi. However, the new airport plans to do more than just transport people by focusing on visitor comfort and valuable services.

Some of Centrair’s expected benefits include 24-hour airport service, which offers a greater range of scheduling and helps create space for oversized cargo and freight planes to arrive and depart without interfering with passenger flights. New 3,500- meter-long runways further promote heavily fueled long-haul flights to the U.S. and southern Europe and new A380 jumbo passenger planes that require longer takeoff and landing strips.

Visitors can expect a compact airport floor plan eliminating excessive walking, domestic and international flights are in the same structure to reduce passenger transit and utilize specially designed “moving” sidewalks wide enough to accommodate wheelchairs and other special-needs passengers. Centrair boasts that visitors never need walk more than 300 meters to get to any gait from the terminal’s hub.

Beyond the needs of transportation, the Central Japan International Airport will host over 15,000 square meters of shopping, activities and restaurants in which to serve its new clientele. Airport planners did their homework when looking to please future business passengers. Wireless LAN service connection is free of charge at 15 locations within terminal confines with additional coin-operated Internet stations at six locations throughout the Passenger Terminal Building. Moreover, copying, fax, conference rooms, computer and mobile phone rental, digital processing of documents and photos, and the capability of interpretation and translation in 10 languages are also available.

Travelers with family will find bathrooms equipped with changing tables, children’s sized facilities and hot water for disinfecting baby items. Other amenities include five separate depots for baby carriage rental and a “Kid’s Square.”

On the fourth floor, jet-lagged guests can explore the “Relaxation Zone” for revitalization options. This facility offers baths, messages, hair styling and beds.

The Central Japan International Airport is constructed on an artificial island in Ise Bay, off the coast of Tokoname. This is Japan’s third offshore airport, following the steps of Nagasaki Airport and Kansai International in Osaka, and is located 35 kilometers south of Nagoya and 170 miles southwest of Tokyo.

Although airport promoters faced some challenges by local fishermen and environmentalists during the construction process, Centrair expects to become Japan’s third busiest international airport, after Narita in Chiba Prefecture, east of Tokyo, and Kansai in Osaka Prefecture and opens with a 4,000-car parking capacity and an expansion to 6,000 depending on future need.

www.centrair.jp/en/index.html

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