Tokyo in 24 Hours

Diverse attractions — both ancient and modern — beckon visitors from far and wide By: Naz Papen
Sushidai // © 2011 Kslee
Sushidai // © 2011 Kslee

More Images

Asakusa // © 2011 Masato OHTA
Asakusa // © 2011 Masato OHTA

Ueno Park // © 2011 Shibuya246
Ueno Park // © 2011 Shibuya246

Hibiki // © 2011 yto
Hibiki // © 2011 yto

Mandarin Oriental, Tokyo // © 2011 Mandarin Oriental Hotel Group
Mandarin Oriental, Tokyo // © 2011 Mandarin Oriental Hotel Group

Web Exclusive

Read about upcoming Tokyo festivals and events

The Details

Japan National Tourism Organization
www.japantravelinfo.com
Tokyo initially appeared to be something beyond my grasp. From its brightly lit skyscrapers to its bustling streets, my first glimpse of Tokyo left me spellbound by the seemingly endless number of sights to be found. Clients traveling to Tokyo can expect to get a glimpse into futuristic attractions, as well as ancient, hidden gems and breathtaking panoramas. The following 24-hour itinerary includes just a few of the many destinations I visited during my trip, from must-see attractions to sights that are located well off the beaten path.

1. Breakfast at Sushidai
Sushi for breakfast is a must while in Japan. Located in the Tsukiji Fish Market, Sushidai has made a name for itself as the restaurant that trumps every succeeding morsel of sushi and sashimi that clients will bite into from here on out. Although ordering a la carte is an option, the set menu, which includes an array of sushi handpicked and prepared by the chef, leaves most diners' palates satisfied.

2. Explore Asakusa
Boasting authentic Japanese architecture, shopping, dining and more, Asakusa makes visitors feel as though they have stepped back in time to traditional Japan. Asakusaís main attraction is the Sensoji Temple, an extremely popular Buddhist temple that dates back to the 7th century. Travelers from far and wide come here to say a prayer and admire its ancient architecture. In addition to Sensoji, visitors can explore Kaminari Gate, Asakusa Shrine, Dempoin Temple and more.

After visiting Sensoji, clients can walk to the Nakamise shopping street to shop for gifts and simultaneously enjoy a quick bite. For a brief respite, suggest clients board the neighboring Sumida River Cruise. Docking and departing around the clock from Asakusa pier, this short, accessible river cruise offers travelers a relaxing view of sights along the shore, such as Sumida Park -- an extremely popular spot for cherry-blossom viewing during spring -- the Asahi Beer Tower and much more.

3. Stroll Around Ueno Park
If clients happen to be traveling in the springtime, make sure that they stop for a quick stroll through Ueno Park in Northern Tokyo. Just a short distance from Asakusa, Ueno Park is famous for not only the multiple museums decorating its grounds but also for the more than 1,000 cherry-blossom trees lining its scenic pathways, usually in full bloom from March to April.

4. Dinner at Hibiki
For authentic Japanese cuisine in a welcoming atmosphere, this pub-style eatery fits the bill. Hibiki offers everything from fresh seafood entrees to vegetarian tofu delights, all for approximately $50. Clients might even find it difficult to remain focused on the meal in front of them since the panoramic views of the Tokyo Bay and Rainbow Bridge appear to be within an arm's reach.

After dinner, suggest clients take a short stroll to Odaiba's famous Ferris wheel. This 15-minute revolution offers riders beautiful views of the Tokyo Bay and Odaiba's impressive architecture.   

5. Nightcap at the Mandarin Oriental, Tokyo
After a long day of exploring the city, clients will want to retire to their hotel room at the Mandarin Oriental, Tokyo to freshen up before heading to its Mandarin Bar to enjoy live music with a cocktail in hand. The bar's relaxing ambience and sleek decor are essential to unwinding from an action-packed day spent traveling all around Tokyo.

Although these recommendations represent just a few itinerary suggestions, Tokyo can be explored in an endless number of ways. Whether clients spend only 24 hours or as long as two weeks in Tokyo, the city offers enough entertainment opportunities and unforgettable landscapes to make them eager to return

>