Norwegian Breakaway Provides More Choices

Norwegian Breakaway Provides More Choices

Norwegian Breakaway offers diners more options than ever By: Marilyn Green
Savor is one of Breakaway’s three main dining rooms. // © 2013 Norwegian Cruise Line
Savor is one of Breakaway’s three main dining rooms. // © 2013 Norwegian Cruise Line

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Norwegian Cruise Line
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Dining onboard Norwegian Cruise Line’s new 4,028-passenger Breakaway is more than a week’s occupation, with 29 restaurants and everything from great blues to Broadway theater to cause decision anxiety.

Breakaway’s dining includes Iron Chef Geoffrey Zakarian’s Ocean Blue seafood restaurant, where the fee has risen to $49. However, less pricey lobster rolls and crab toasts are available a la carte at the outdoor Ocean Blue on the Waterfront, and next door is the chef’s Raw Bar, pairing shellfish and wines.

Buddy Valastro from Cake Boss has opened Carlo’s Bake Shop onboard, offering his signature goodies, pre-ordered custom cakes for special occasions and cupcake decorating classes.

Twin dining rooms Savor and Taste share a menu, while the third main dining room, the Manhattan Room, offers its own menu and a sweeping dance floor, currently filled by excerpts from the dramatic show “Burn the Floor.” The complimentary 24-hour O’Sheehan’s features pub grub favorites from fish and chips to shepherd’s pie, as well as very good draft beer.

Breakaway’s complimentary Garden Cafe has ample cuisine choices and special dietary items, with the Uptown Bar & Grill serving as the outdoor face of the cafe. Among other possibilities are the French LeBistro, the Shanghai Noodle Bar and the Teppanyaki Room, ranging from $20-$30 per person.

Like the rest of the Norwegian fleet, Breakaway has Freestyle Dining — you come when you wish. A system borrowed from ski resorts shows how many tables are free in the various eateries and how long the wait time is if your choice is full.

Breakaway sails year-round from New York City, giving travelers plenty of opportunities to eat their way across the sea.

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