Revitalization Lights Up Old Mazatlan

City completes Phase I of ambitious project

By: Dawna Robertson

The Angela Peralta Theater is one lady who doesn’t mind revealing her age. Why would she, looking as grand as ever at 130 years? This theater in the heart of Mazatlan’s Historical Center once suffered from neglect. Not any longer.

During the summer, the city and its residents completed their refurbishment of the landmark building. Now, fresh paint and bright lights adorn her elegant facade.

The beautifully restored Angela Peralta is part of a major revitalization effort for Old Mazatlan to reclaim the grandeur, vitality and unique style of the area’s historic core. Summer marked the completion of Phase I, which focused on the restoration, landscaping and dramatic lighting effects on major colonial sites.

“Mazatlan is one destination on Mexico’s Pacific Coast with a rich cultural heritage,” said Carlos Berdegue, Vice President of the Mazatlan Hotel Association and Tourism Board. “Visitors enjoy golden sand beaches as well as a vibrant arts and culture scene in Old Mazatlan.”

Known as El Centro Historico, Old Mazatlan is a 180-block area with 479 buildings designated as national historic landmarks. The charming colonial district is characterized by cobblestone streets, fanciful balconies, iron railings, colorful 19th-Century buildings, parks, lush foliage and a band shell hosting free concerts.

At one time, El Centro was Mazatlan’s commercial center. Today, the city and its residents are resurrecting the area as a cultural and entertainment hub. Now on El Centro’s lively streets, people gather to enjoy shops, museums, art galleries, al fresco dining, contemporary dance, jazz clubs, concerts and unique examples of neoclassical architecture.

Located on the Pacific Ocean at the foot of the Sierra Madre Mountains, Mazatlan is Mexico’s second largest coastal state. The city is divided into two main areas Old Mazatlan and Zona Dorada, with a seven-mile coastal road connecting the two. Known for its sportsfishing, the city is home to Mexico’s largest Pacific Coast port.

www.mazatlan.com.mx

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