Agents Assess Daily Reporting

ARC’s move would affect some agencies, while others see it as no problem

By: Robert Carlsen

For many agencies with small staffs, daily ARC reporting, as proposed by a new ARC plan, would be a major hassle and time-waster.

But for other agencies that are not so high on selling air tickets to begin with, it would be at best (or worst) a half-hour per day job.

Janet Staton, owner of Vista Travel in Las Cruces, N.M., said it takes one of her staffers at least two hours a week to do the ARC report, depending on the amount of tickets her four agents sell, the number of voids and exchanges they implement and the amount of checking and rechecking needed for accuracy.

Multiply that by five and Staton said that the 10 hours a week an agent spends doing the reports is time taken away from her real job selling travel.

“Daily reporting would not be an improvement for my business,” she said. Even with weekly reporting, the way Staton sets up her work schedules makes it difficult to have someone in the office every day dedicated to do the work. Currently, agent Diane Cashman-Howard works mornings while Staton comes to the office in the afternoons, meaning, at most, there are only three agents in the office at one time.

“If ARC goes to daily reporting, I don’t even want to think of the personnel nightmare this will entail,” she said. “One of us will have to become a full-time accountant instead of a part-time accountant and part-time travel agent.”

Karen Torello, manager of Holiday Travel in Burlingame, Calif., has six employees at her office. She said daily reporting would be an “inconvenience,” but not a major problem.

“We’re just doing less and less air sales,” she said. “Our report is not complicated, it takes about a half-hour.” Even big agencies with lots of employees will have to readjust with daily reporting.

Brad Anderson at Anderson Travel & Cruises in San Diego said the accountant who handles the ARC report for his 100 employees in eight branches comes into the office three days a week.

Otherwise, Anderson said daily reporting would also be an inconvenience.

“The airlines don’t need more reasons for us to stop selling air,” he said. “They need more support from us. This will make it a little tougher for us to recommend our clients to fly.”